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Selena Gomez Sets the Red Carpet Ablaze With Her Latest Ensemble

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Selena Gomez‘s latest ensemble is on fire!

The 27-year-old star dressed to impress at the ACLU SoCal Annual Bill of Rights dinner on Sunday night at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel, wearing a spicy orange outfit that can only be described as a Phoenix rising through the ashes.

Well, that might a bit dramatic, however, the “Look at Her Now” singer certainly brought fiery fashion to the star-studded event! Making her pumpkin spice-colored cocktail dress pop even more, Gomez rocked an equally bold makeup look.

Instead of sticking to her usual pink and nude lipstick color, she opted for something more fierce: a vampy red shade that accentuated her plump lips. Moreover, her hair also matched her spicy ensemble, because her loose waves appeared to have an auburn tint to it when it hit the lights. 

If anything, it makes sense the actress would pull out all the stops for the special event, considering she’s presenting tonight. Regina HallBob Balaban and Richard Schiff are also presenters.

Additionally, this year’s honorees include Don Cheadle, Justin Tranter and Judy Balaban. “At a time when our rights and freedoms are under all-out attack, we are proud to pay tribute to our honorees,” ACLU SoCal Executive Director Hector Villagra previously said in a press release shared with E! News. “Their work and dedication inspire us.”

As of late, Selena has been vocal about fighting for people to have equal rights. Back in October, she penned a powerful essay on the immigration crisis for Time magazine. Not only did she reflect on her family’s personal experience with immigration, but she expressed that she wants to advocate for those going through similar situations.

“Over the past four decades, members of my family have worked hard to gain United States citizenship,” she shared. “Undocumented immigration is an issue I think about every day, and I never forget how blessed I am to have been born in this country thanks to my family and the grace of circumstance.”

“I don’t claim to be an expert. I’m not a politician, I’m not a doctor, and I don’t work in the system at all,” Gomez later added. “I understand it’s flawed and that we need rules and regulations, but we also have to remember that our country was formed by people who came here from other countries. It’s time to listen to the people whose lives are being directly affected by immigration policies. It’s time to get to know the individuals whose complex stories have been reduced to basic headlines.”

She also touched on the Netflix documentary series she executive produced and how she was deeply impacted by it.

“In 2017, I was approached about getting involved in a new documentary series called Living Undocumented that would shine a light on eight immigrant families in the U.S. from different countries and backgrounds, all facing possible deportation,” she explained. “I watched footage outlining their deeply personal journeys and I cried. It captured the shame, uncertainty, and fear I saw my own family struggle with. But it also captured the hope, optimism, and patriotism so many undocumented immigrants still hold in their hearts despite the hell they go through.”

She went on to say, “When I signed on to executive produce a show about undocumented immigrants, I couldn’t help but anticipate the criticisms I might face. But the truth is, the worst criticism I can imagine is still nothing compared to what undocumented immigrants face every day.”

“Fear shouldn’t stop us from getting involved and educating ourselves on an issue that affects millions of people in our country,” she said. “Fear didn’t stop my aunt from getting into the back of that truck. And for that, I will always be grateful.”



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The More (and More) the Merrier

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Never mind that old Coco Chanel chestnut about taking one thing off before walking out the door. Today, you may want to add more to the mix.

One of the current preoccupations of fine jewelry collectors is an assemblage of necklaces that is layered, personal and playfully disheveled (or artfully edited, as the case may be). It is an ideal display for items à la mode — initial necklaces, chains, coin pendants — and whatever else finds its way into the jumble.

(The look even has an Instagram nickname: the #neckmess. Coined in 2016 by the Rhode Island-based designer Jessica Kagan Cushman, the term has made it into jewelry vernacular.)

According to Lauren Kulchinsky Levison, the vice president of the East Hampton boutique Mayfair Rocks, the practice of stacking and staggering necklaces is an approach favored by clients who “want to wear jewelry in a more magical way,” rather than the blunt force of big statement pieces. “Any jewelry designer who isn’t making necklaces that can be added into someone’s daily look and combine with all the other designers out there is missing out.”

One of those women, Lucy Wallace Eustice, co-founder of the handbag brand MZ Wallace, met her match in two jewelry labels that have been around for less than a decade: Marla Aaron and Foundrae. Both instill elements of storytelling in their outputs.

The foundation of the Aaron collection is a range of chains and locks, hardware-inspired elements (often bejeweled or engraved) that function as pendants or charm holders, or that can be joined together to create bracelets, necklaces or other adornments. Foundrae primarily creates jewelry and medallions embellished with symbols representing themes like resilience and trust.

Ms. Wallace Eustice’s daily changing lineup of necklaces draws heavily from both lines. She also incorporates finds she has amassed over the years, like a Cartier strand of petite gold balls and a crimson bead from a Left Bank vintage boutique in Paris that she adds to other pieces. The flexibility to mix and remix different elements of a necklace — pendants and charms, chains and beads — fits neatly into current thinking about conscious consumption: buying less and buying thoughtfully.

Part of the fun of the layered necklace look is “restyling it,” Ms. Wallace Eustice said. “You get a variety of looks out of fewer things that you mix up in different ways. It’s not prescriptive.”

Building a better #neckmess may not be prescriptive, but sometimes it might be curative. “We’re all at a point of searching for answers because things are so out of control,” the actress Busy Philipps said. At a moment when she was looking for what she described as “a daily reminder to stay grounded and let go,” she began collecting crystal necklaces, jewels that for millenniums have figured in mystical lore. And she said she discovered makers of “crystal and intention-based jewelry,” like Rock & Raw Jewellery, — who create pieces that are markedly more fashionable than the versions of yore.

New arrivals have joined her crystal talismans. First came a strand of opal beads (then another) from her close friend, the Los Angeles-based jeweler Irene Neuwirth. Those were followed by a zodiac pendant representing Ms. Philipps’s birth sign, Cancer, and a rainbow-colored tennis necklace from The Last Line.



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‘A Million Little Pieces’ Review: Cracking Up

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Adapting James Frey’s infamously fictionalized memoir, “A Million Little Pieces,” the director Sam Taylor-Johnson niftily elides the book’s truthiness problem with an introductory quotation from Mark Twain.

“I’ve lived through some terrible things in my life, some of which actually happened,” it reads, before we see a physically wrecked James (vividly played by Aaron Taylor-Johnson, the director’s husband and screenwriting partner) slouched on a plane and headed to a Minnesota clinic. A substance abuser since childhood (crack and alcohol are his favorites), James is now 23 and one drink away from almost certain death.

So begins yet another ruin-and-rehab tale, one that initially tantalizes then flatly disappoints. In an intensely physical performance, Taylor-Johnson leaps and writhes and trembles through treatment as James endures a root canal, a broken-nose reset and a clarinet-playing roommate — all without anesthesia. Yet there’s no hint of what drove him to destroy himself and not a single reason for the audience to invest in his recovery.

Looking elsewhere for entertainment, we find an affable Billy Bob Thornton as a laid-back rehab regular, and a very touching Odessa Young as Lilly, James’s fragile love interest. Jeff Cronenweth’s cinematography is often eloquent and more creative than the script, especially in the film’s euphoric opening as James dances wildly, naked and out of his mind. Later, as he and Lilly slowly circle each other in an intimate, forbidden conversation, the camera hovers so protectively we wonder if it knows something that we don’t.

Moments like these brighten a movie that’s otherwise dull and sadly unmemorable. Mostly, it just reminded me how much I enjoy Billy Bob Thornton.

A Million Little Pieces

Rated R for unmediated dentistry and unruly penises. Running time: 1 hour 53 minutes.

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Taylor Swift’s Song ”Christmas Tree Farm” Is a Magical Masterpiece

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She’s done it again! 

The reigning queen of modern pop is back with new music, but this time, it’s a Christmas song!

Taylor Swift unveiled her soon-to-be hit song Christmas Tree Farm.” The singer announced the news on Thursday via Twitter to adoring fans. “When in doubt, ask the itty bitty pretty kitty committee,” she tweeted out alongside a video talking to her cat Meredith. “When they shun you with silence, ambivalence, and judgmental brush offs…just put the song out anyway. NEW XMAS SONG AND VIDEO (made from home videos.) OUT TONIGHT.” 

Thank goodness Meredith agreed to release the song, because fans were treated to what is sure to be a classic Christmas staple for years to come. For those not up to speed with Taylor’s life story, she spent a lot of her childhood on her families Christmas tree farm, which makes this single extra special. 

From all of the personal home footage from the video and the intimate lyrics, this song paints a picture of a beautiful and idealistic time of year for the musician. Undoubtedly one of her most personal pieces yet. 

“I actually did grow up on a Christmas tree farm,” she also tweeted. “In a gingerbread house, deep within the yummy gummy gumdrop forest. Where, funnily enough, this song is their national anthem.”

The song and video is set to debut on Friday morning on Good Morning America as well. This isn’t Taylor’s first foray into holiday music either. 

She released Taylor Swift Holiday Collection EP in October 2007. That album, however, featured covers of George Michael’s “Last Christmas,” “White Christmas,” “Silent Night,” “Santa Baby” and her original songs “Christmases When You Were Mine” and “Christmas Must Be Something More.”

Hopefully Taylor and Meredith have more holiday music up their sleeve! 

E! News returns Monday, Jan. 6 at 7 a.m.!



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