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Coronavirus wipes out $1.7 trillion in US stock market value in two days

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The S&P 500 just wiped out about $1.737 trillion of its value during its two-day market sell-off, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.

The equity benchmark lost $810 billion in value on Tuesday, adding to its $927 billion loss on Monday, according to the firm’s Senior Index Analyst Howard Silverblatt. It’s down $2.138 trillion since last Wednesday’s high, according to S&P Dow Jones.

Stocks cratered again on Tuesday as investors fled riskier assets amid intense fears about a slowdown in global growth caused by the deadly coronavirus. The S&P 500′s two-day loss of 6.3% was the largest for the benchmark since August 2015, when the Chinese government devalued the yuan amid the U.S.-China trade war.

Tuesday’s 900 point drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average added to Monday’s stunning 1,000 point plunge. The Nasdaq Composite fell 2.8% on Tuesday and joined the S&P 500 and Dow in turning negative for the year. Bond yields also plunged as investor sought safer havens. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell to a record low of 1.32%.

The spreading deadly virus, that has infected more than 80,000 and killed more than 2,700, has sent shock waves through the markets. Companies like Apple, Nike, United Airlines and Mastercard have all raised flags about the coronavirus and its impact on their earnings. Chip stocks, which rely heavily on revenues from China, are being abandoned by Wall Street as it becomes more apparent supply chain disruption will persist until the epidemic is contained.

Health officials at the Centers for Disease Control said Tuesday the coronavirus is “likely” to continue to spread throughout the United States and the American public should “prepare for the expectation that this is going to be bad.” This follows news on Monday about a spike in cases in other countries in Asia, the Middle East and Europe, outside the virus’s epicenter in China. Investors are closely watching reports in Italy, Iran and South Korea.

Top White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told CNBC that the U.S. economy is “holding up nicely” and that the coronavirus in this country is “pretty close to air-tight’ containment.

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As work from home becomes the norm, companies get more comfortable hiring fully remote employees

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Working from home for the past few weeks? You might have a serious case of cabin fever by now. Or then again, you may have found you prefer it to your former routine. If you’d rather not go back to the office even after the pandemic is finally over, this might be the moment to start looking for a new job that allows—or requires—you to stay home.

Remote job openings were proliferating well before this crisis, rising 270% since 2017, according to new research by job search engine Adzuna that analyzed 4.5 million U.S. postings. Now, spurred on by COVID-19, it seems even more employers want the chance to recruit from a vast talent pool unrestricted by geographic distance.

“Our data shows a continued increase in work-from-home vacancies,” notes Adzuna cofounder Andrew Hunter. Companies that never recruited many (or any) virtual employees before are “embarking on a giant work-from-home experiment,” he adds. “The standard office-based job is increasingly a thing of the past.”

One place to start looking for remote work: Job site FlexJobs has come up with a list of the 35 U.S. employers who are doing the most work-from-home recruiting right now, along with brief descriptions of what kinds of roles they need to fill. For instance, Aetna (#2 on the ranking behind Adobe) is looking for social workers, a lead data scientist, and registered nurses to work as case managers. Dell (#6) is seeking cybersecurity pros and an infrastructure automation engineer.

While both Adzuna and FlexJobs data suggest many current openings call for tech or health care skills, employers are also hiring remote employees in sales, accounting, customer service, human resources, and other fields, some of them highly specialized. UnitedHealth Group, for example, is seeking an expert in dealing with the medical bureaucracy at the Veterans Administration.

Planning to apply? Beyond having the skills and experience in the job description, employers want to see evidence that you’re flexible enough to work alone. So rewrite your resume and cover letter to emphasize, for instance, projects where you collaborated with distant teammates, maybe across different time zones. Since working at home means you’ll have limited access to the company IT help desk, it’s smart to include a list of the collaboration software and web and video conferencing tools you know how to use.

A tip from FlexJobs: Interviewers for remote jobs usually ask the same questions as for other roles, but get ready for a few twists. The virtual-work equivalent of the old stand-by “What’s your greatest weakness?”, for example, is “Why do you want to work remotely?”

This query can be such a minefield for the unprepared that FlexJobs’ report recommends bringing it up yourself even if the interviewer doesn’t ask. Maybe you’ve found that you’re much more productive working at home than in your old noisy open-plan office, or maybe you live in an area where opportunities in your field are scarce (or require a long commute). If you’re enthusiastic about the chance to work for this particular company, remotely or not, don’t forget to say so.

If you can draw a specific example or two from your current remote work, demonstrating how you’ve been able to achieve results from home that equal or exceed what you could have accomplished in the office, so much better. The point is to reassure the interviewer that, even if your only work-at-home experience so far has been dictated by COVID-19, you’re a safe bet as a stellar remote employee in the future.

More must-read careers coverage from Fortune:

—3 ways to manage conflict when you work remotely
—How to job hunt during the coronavirus pandemic
—Everything you need to know about furloughs—and what they mean for workers
—4 things to say if recruiters call you during the coronavirus pandemic
—Listen to Leadership Next, a Fortune podcast examining the evolving role of CEO
—WATCH: 401(k) withdrawal penalties waived for anyone hurt by COVID-19

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Google G Suite passes 6 million customers

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during a conference in Brussels on January 20, 2020.

Kenzo Tribouillard | AFP | Getty Images

Google’s G Suite bundle of productivity software for businesses, schools and governments had over 6 million paying businesses in March, up from 5 million in February 2019, executive Javier Soltero told CNBC on Tuesday.

The growth comes in an increasingly important area for Google parent Alphabet, which disclosed cloud revenue, including from G Suite, for the first time in February. Expansion in the category could help Alphabet grow outside its core area of advertising, which made up 83% of Alphabet’s revenue last year.

However, G Suite in particular faces stiff competition from Microsoft’s entrenched Office suite and Office 365 set of cloud-based services, which had 87.5% of the market for productivity suites in 2018 versus Google’s 10.4%, according to estimates shared by industry-research company Gartner.

“The business of G Suite is growing at an incredibly healthy and, frankly for me, surprising rate,” Javier Soltero, vice president and general manager of G Suite at Google, told CNBC in an interview on Tuesday. Soltero joined Google in October after working at Microsoft, where he had been corporate vice president for the Office product group, among other roles.

Millions of people have been working from home to reduce the spread of coronavirus. That has boosted adoption of the Google Meet productivity-oriented video-calling service, one component of G Suite alongside Gmail, Google Drive and other services. The service has 25 times more users than it did in January, Soltero said. Google Meet is separate from the consumer-focused Hangouts, which is available to anyone with a Google account.

Last month, as cases of COVID-19 were ramping up, Google extended features of Meets — including space for up to 250 participants on any given call and live streaming for up to 100,000 viewers on a domain — that are normally reserved for customers of the G Suite enterprise tier of service to all of its G Suite customers until July 1. Now that’s been extended until September 30. 

Services that compete with Meet, like Cisco’s Webex, Zoom and Microsoft’s Teams, have also taken on new users in the past few months.

Alphabet had $2.61 billion in cloud revenue in the fourth quarter, up 53% on an annualized basis, representing 5.7% of total revenue. The total includes contributions from Google Cloud Platform, the cloud infrastructure for running third-party applications that competes with Microsoft’s Azure and Amazon Web Services. “The growth rate of GCP was meaningfully higher than that of cloud overall,” Alphabet finance chief Ruth Porat told analysts in February, noting that G Suite growth comes from increase in the number of seats and the amount of revenue the company pulls in from each seat.

Google made Meet and Google Classroom available to 1.3 million New York City students in just days as the city’s education department sought to stop the use of Zoom, Soltero said. And within days, he said, the company delivered access to millions of students in Italy following a request from that country’s ministry of education. After working in enterprise software for 25 years, Soltero was surprised how quickly Google was able to roll out its services to so many people. 

“We are guided by building products that people choose. That’s a core principle. That’s been what I’ve admired about G Suite from the beginning,” he said.

WATCH: NYC education department tells principals to stop using Zoom, citing privacy concerns

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Young Adults, Burdened With Debt, Are Now Facing an Economic Crisis

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The last time a serious economic downturn hit in 2008, Evan Schade was in high school and the crisis seemed like a news event that happened to other people. This time, as the coronavirus has brought the economy to its knees, it has become a personal affair.

When nonessential businesses were closed last month in Kansas City, Mo., where he lives, Mr. Schade, 26, lost his job at a carpet store and almost all of the shifts in his second job at a coffee shop. His girlfriend, Kaitlyn Gardner, 23, was laid off from a different coffee shop.

The money they have in their bank accounts, just over $1,000, is enough to cover only April’s $800 rent check — forget about his $300 student loan payments or the health insurance he was hoping to finally sign up for. The couple have spent their time at home applying for unemployment and fruitlessly looking for new work.

“I know so many people my age who are going through the exact same thing,” Ms. Gardner said.

The youngest American adults are facing what is, for most of them, the first serious economic crisis of their working lives. By most measures, they are woefully unprepared.

“Nowadays I might get a $5 order from McDonald’s after three hours of waiting,” he said.

Mr. Lawson has a 2-year-old and a pregnant wife, who does not work. They were down to eating plain noodles until he visited a food bank and got a bag of potatoes and some carrots. He has set up accounts on all the social networks to broadcast his need for work — any work.

“Give me something I could feed my family with,” he said. “I don’t care what it is.”

The inequality among millennials is even more evident when race is taken into account. Young black families at all educational levels have fallen further behind their white peers over the last two decades in measures like household wealth and homeownership, according to research from New America.

“Over time, it is becoming more difficult for young families to accumulate wealth,” said William R. Emmons, the lead economist at the St. Louis Federal Reserve’s Center for Household Financial Stability. “We thought maybe they’d catch up later, but the current situation doesn’t give me much reason to believe that’s going to happen.”

These disadvantages are already shaping the long-term prospects of young Americans. They are much less likely to be married, have children or own a house than Americans of a similar age in decades past.

Ms. Gardner said that she and Mr. Schade eventually wanted to have a family and a house. But she said, “We’re both going to be in debt for a while, and having kids is just not feasible.”

While there is a chance the downturn will be short, economists are assuming that the turmoil that has already happened will have long-term consequences for young households.

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