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5 Classical Music Concerts to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend

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Our guide to the city’s best classical music and opera happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

ALARM WILL SOUND at Merkin Hall (Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m.). Donnacha Dennehy’s opera on the Irish famine of the mid-19th century, “The Hunger,” returns to New York with this excellent ensemble and the original cast, the soprano Katherine Manley and the folk singer Iarla O Lionaird. Before that, in this opening concert of the Ecstatic Music festival, is a performance of “When Fire Is Allowed to Finish” by Eartheater (Alexandra Drewchin), with six movements of music arranged by the composers Aaron Parker, Steven Snowden and Conrad Winslow.
212-501-3330, kaufmanmusiccenter.org

AMERICAN CLASSICAL ORCHESTRA at Alice Tully Hall (Sept. 19, 8 p.m.). A mainstay of the New York scene, this period-instrument ensemble is playing its 35th season this year. It celebrates with the overture to Rossini’s “Semiramide,” Beethoven’s Symphony No. 2 and Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23, with David Belkovski playing the fortepiano. Thomas Crawford conducts.
212-721-6500, aconyc.org

LARA DOWNES at National Sawdust (Sept. 13, 7 p.m.). Downes will be joined by the harpist Bridget Kibbey, the singer Magos Herrera and her fellow pianist Simone Dinnerstein for “Holes in the Sky,” a concert of music by women composers including Clara Schumann, Florence Price, Meredith Monk and Paola Prestini. Clemency Burton-Hill, of WQXR, will moderate a discussion.
646-779-8455, nationalsawdust.org

[Read about the events that our other critics have chosen for the week ahead.]

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC at David Geffen Hall (Sept. 18-19, 7:30 p.m.; through Sept. 21). Jaap van Zweden seems to have settled on what he sees as the ideal balance of the new and the old at the Philharmonic, a vision of which this first subscription program of the year provides a decent example. There’s a popular classic, in the shape of excerpts from Prokofiev’s “Romeo and Juliet”; there’s a bit of a rarity, as the Broadway star Kelli O’Hara continues her longstanding interest in the classical world with Barber’s “Knoxville: Summer of 1915”; and there’s contemporary music, with the premiere of Philip Glass’s “King Lear Overture.”
212-875-5656, nyphil.org

JOSHUA ROMAN AND CONOR HANICK at the crypt of the Church of the Intercession (Sept. 18, 8 p.m.). The Crypt Sessions, deep in the bowels of a Harlem church, continue with this artful duo of Roman on cello and Hannick on piano playing a Schnittke sonata and two works by Arvo Pärt, “Fratres” and “Spiegel im Spiegel.” Good luck getting a ticket, though; Death of Classical’s series has become one of the most difficult tickets in town, and with good reason.
deathofclassical.com

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Disclosure of Plácido Domingo Allegations Scuttles $500,000 Deal

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Next month, Mr. Domingo is scheduled to sing the title role in Verdi’s “Simon Boccanegra” at the Hamburg State Opera. A spokesman for the company, Michael Bellgardt, said in an email on Tuesday that he expected Mr. Domingo to perform as planned “if nothing happens to call this into question.”

He is still expected to appear as Giorgio Germont in Verdi’s “La Traviata” in May at the Teatro Real in Madrid, said Graça Prata Ramos, a spokeswoman for the company. And the Royal Opera House in London said that it planned to go ahead with his appearances there this summer. “Plácido will be here in the summer performing as planned in ‘Don Carlo,’ ” Vicky Kington, a spokeswoman, said in an email Tuesday.

But there was a shift at the Salzburg Festival in Austria, which was the site of Mr. Domingo’s first return to the stage after the allegations against him were made public last summer. He is scheduled to return there in August to sing in Verdi’s “I Vespri Siciliani.” But the festival said it would seek further information before deciding on a course of action.

“The festival’s priority was and remains to treat the singer, who has been confronted with accusations of wrongdoing, fairly — in other words, not to rush to any judgment,” it said in a statement. “The facts, however, have now changed.”

Citing Mr. Domingo’s apology, which, it noted, conceded “that his behavior might have hurt the women in question,” the festival said it would seek more information about the investigations in the United States.

Mr. Domingo said in his statement that he took responsibility for his actions.

“I accept full responsibility for my actions, and I have grown from this experience,” he continued. “I understand now that some women may have feared expressing themselves honestly because of a concern that their careers would be adversely affected if they did so. While that was never my intention, no one should ever be made to feel that way.”

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‘My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising’ Review: Superpowers Served Sweetly

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A popular manga series gets a worthy film installment with “My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising,” an exhilarating animation that frames heroism as an act of community. In it, superpowered teenagers train to become professional heroes, then find themselves tested by the emergence of real villains. When they’re charged with defending a peaceful village, they become a team, sacrificing their individual dreams of glory for the greater good — as if “Seven Samurai” had gotten a pastel and playful transformation.

Directed by Kenji Nagasaki, the movie follows Midoriya (who goes by the nickname Deku and is voiced by Daiki Yamashita), a bright-eyed, green-haired student of U.A. High School, where aspiring heroes are trained. Though he has been gifted with a much-admired super ability — aptly dubbed the power of One for All — Deku is gentle. He’s driven by his love for the people he aspires to protect, a quality that makes him a sharp contrast with his egotistic rival, Bakugo (Nobuhiko Okamoto). But when villains appear, Deku and Bakugo band together with their classmates to fight against forces they don’t know if they can defeat alone.

The tenderness of Deku adds to the film’s often surprising emotional potency. But the visual style of the movie also works in service of feeling. At first the film employs bold, playful character design, delighting in images like a hero whose arms have eyeballs keeping watch on lifeguard duty. But as the challenges escalate, the design of the film becomes abstracted. Fights rage in almost Kandinsky-esque flurries of light and color; time stretches for the length of a single kick to encompass elegiac pop ballads. This is canny, passionate filmmaking, a reminder of the power of two-dimensional animation. First, it humanizes, then it astounds.

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising

Rated PG-13 for action and intense images. In Japanese, with subtitles. Running time: 1 hour 44 minutes.

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‘I Am Not Okay With This’ Review: You’d Like Her When She’s Angry

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Beyond this core pair, the characterizations are mostly flat: cliquish students, stuffy authority figures and clueless grown-ups. Sydney’s overtaxed mother, Maggie (Kathleen Rose Perkins), gets the occasional character-deepening scene; Stanley’s brutish trucker dad (Mark Colson) is not so well-served, and Brad is essentially a human varsity jacket.

“Okay” shares producers with Netflix’s “Stranger Things,” and it also shares that show’s love of pastiche. As it went on, I grew more and more conscious of the teen-culture parts it was built from — “Sixteen Candles” here, “Carrie” there, and the fifth episode is a full-on “Breakfast Club” homage, complete with a recon-mission caper and a burnout-girl character in the John Bender role.

As in Netflix’s “Sex Education,” set in a British idea of an American high school, “Okay” is full of 1980s music cues, both soundtrack and diegetic, to the extent that I had to double back and make sure it wasn’t a period piece. It is not; it just loves the ’80s, to the point that Stanley is an aficionado of VHS tapes. (“Best platform there is.”)

This device, in “Okay” and elsewhere, may be just a sign of how the pop culture of the past is ever more accessible, though it sometimes makes me wonder whether I am simply watching an old person’s idea of young people. (As someone who listened to Prefab Sprout when it was age-appropriate, I am probably not the one to answer that.)

Still, as in “Stranger Things” — which uses its recycled references like a joyous collage — this nostalgia also serves a point, albeit a darker one. From the retro aesthetic to the boxy used cars, Brownsville has the out-of-time feel of a declining industrial town in which nothing has changed since 1987. All of this underlines Sydney’s feelings of suffocation, which manifest in her increasingly violent, uncontrollable outbursts, which make her something like a telekinetic Hulk.

“I Am Not Okay With This” may not surprise you much, but it has charm and voice to spare. And bucking the streaming-TV bloat trend, it runs seven energetic episodes of around twenty minutes apiece. A story about raging hormones and elemental forces, after all, should know the power of a swift explosion.

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